MYTH

ETHANOL BURNS HOTTER THAN PETROLEUM-BASED FUELS

FACT

ETHANOL BURNS COOLER THAN PETROLEUM-BASED FUELS, WHICH CREATES AN INCREASE IN TORQUE

Ethanol has a higher Heat of Vaporization relative to gasoline - a significantly higher value.
The chart below summarizes typical the properties of ethanol vs gasoline.

Referring to the Heat of Vaporization values in the above chart (HoV), ethanol has 3 times the Heat of Vaporization based on volume (gallon to gallon) yet 4 times the HoV based on energy content (when both fuels are operating at a stoichiometric mixture, or a 1.0 lambda). Why is this important? Before a fuel combusts, it must exist as vapor mixed with air, using oxygen in the atmosphere as the source of its oxidant. Therefore, as liquid fuel is introduced into the manifold either by carburetion or fuel injection, it must first change from the liquid to vapor phase and sufficiently mix with the air before it will combust. The energy required to vaporize the fuel comes mostly from the air, but a portion actually comes from engine intake surfaces as the fuel vapor contacts it. However, it is most ideal to use as much of the air for vaporization to maximize volumetric efficiency. If a fuel has a higher heat of vaporization, the intake air temperature will be reduced, resulting in better volumetric efficiencies as the inlet charge has a higher density. From this, one would expect significant gains in torque performance with ethanol relative to gasoline, and dyno test after dyno test have shown this to indeed be the case.

MYTH

ETHANOL AND METHANOL ARE BASICALLY THE SAME

FACT

ETHANOL IS SIMPLY NO DIFFERENT THAN DISTILLED SPIRITS - SIPPIN' WHISKEY, IF YOU WILL.

Methanol is often called Wood Alcohol, or it can be made from natural gas. Methanol is extremely toxic and should
not be ingested, inhaled or come into contact with skin.

Methanol is also more corrosive than ethanol, which is why ethanol is a better choice for engines. Indy cars prior to
2007 used methanol, converted for a short time to E98 and now run E85. NASCAR uses E15 in all three of their national series. Since 2011, NASCAR has surpassed 11 million competition miles on E15.

MYTH

ETHANOL IS ONLY FOR YOUR DAILY DRIVER

FACT

ETHANOL HAS BENEFITS THAT'S MADE FOR RACING

The benefits of ethanol relative to race fuel are multifold, but let's focus on the one many of you already have guessed - power. A typical (R+M)/2 octane rating of e85 is around 100, though the traditional AKI octane rating does not do true justice to ethanol. The MON test eliminates all cooling effects from the Heat of Vaporization when testing fuels and severely penalizes ethanol relative to gasoline. It is through the cooling effect of HoV that ethanol lowers the octane needs of the internal combustion engine. We all know heat robs power and makes engines more prone to detonation. A naturally high RON coupled with ethanol's superior cooling.

MYTH

ETHANOL IS HARMFUL

FACT

ETHANOL IS BIO-DEGRADABLE & LESS TOXIC TO HUMANS

Beyond the power benefits that ethanol can provide there are two other big factors that make ethanol an attractive fuel for high performance applications. First, it's renewable. Second, it's clean-burning and bio degradable. In addition, since ethanol is less volatile than gasoline, there's a reduced chance of explosion in spills and accidents. Most importantly, ethanol is far less toxic to the user than both methanol and gasoline.

MYTH

ALTERNATE FUELS AREN'T GOING TO REPLACE PETROLEUM BASED FULES

FACT

ETHANOL IS A GREAT ALTERNATIVE REPLACE PETROLEUM BASED FUELS

Ethanol is a renewable, earth-friendly biofuel made from plants. It's a high-quality, high-octane fuel that burns cleaner and cooler than oil, which is good for our environment and our car engines. Ethanol cuts carbon emissions by an average of 43 percent, and this percentage continues to increase with ongoing innovations. In fact, each year, ethanol production and use decreases greenhouse gas emissions by 110 million metric tons, which is the carbon equivalent of removing 20 million cars from the road. By 2022, the USDA anticipates that corn ethanol's relative carbon benefits will rise to 50 percent or more thanks to ongoing innovations.

Today, 97 percent of America's motor fuel mix contains about 10 percent ethanol, and higher blends are increasingly available. These new consumer options have appeared, in part, thanks to public policies, like the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), that require oil companies to offer consumers more renewable fuel options at the pump. Moreover, there are many second- and third-generation ethanol feed stocks available such as residuals from crop and forest harvests (corn husks, corn stalks, or sawdust), perennial grass, fast-growing trees, and, one day, even algae. In other words, the leaves that fall from the trees in your yard can be collected and turned into ethanol. Not only that but advancements in what scientists call biomass catalytic, cellulosic, and even algae-based technologies.

MYTH

IT'S EXPENSIVE TO CONVERT TO ETHANOL

FACT

ENGINES OF ALL TYPES CAN BE COVERTED TO RUN ETHANOL

Synthetic materials are now used to replace rubber components that are reactive with ethanol, and fuel system parts can be substituted with materials less prone to corrosion or coated (i.e., anodized), which eliminate any issues. With limited vehicle modifications costing between $50 and $150 per vehicle, new vehicles can be produced to run on as much as 85 percent ethanol (e85) as well as 100 percent gasoline.